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      girraween > history > chapter 5


Extreme Temperatures


Girraween National Park is pleasantly cool most of the year. Winters are usually dry and cold with frosty nights/mornings reaching an average minimum of -4°C and picturesque days reaching 15-22°C. Summer days are a warm 28-32°C, with cooler nights averaging 15-18°C.

While there is an official account of -16°C (1941), there is no doubt that in certain areas of the park temperatures could plummet to even lower. So too, the maximum temperature could definitely reach a little higher in exposed granite areas than the official record of 40°C (1973 and 2000).


Hail and Snow

Girraween will often experience hail. Usually the hailstones are the size of peas, but some have been as large as cricket balls (August 1952).

Most years there are light falls of snow flakes, sleet or sago snow (wet snow). Snow has fallen in the park as early as the 13th of May and as late as mid November, but it's mainly through June and July that Girraween's snowfalls are experienced.

A covering of snow fell on Friday 13th July 1967, however it was the foot or more of snow (30cm) that fell from 4th July 1984 that has remained as Girraween's biggest and most memorable snowfall. Even the Pyramids were snow-capped!


More Photos... Frost

More Photos... Snow

Next...  A Fiery History.

  One of Girraween's frosty mornings.
© Girraween National Park, 2009.
One of Girraween's frosty mornings.



Bald Rock Creek.
© Girraween National Park, 2009.
Bald Rock Creek.



Snow on the Pyramids.
© Girraween National Park, 2009.
Snow on the Pyramids.



Fun in the snow!.
© Girraween National Park, 2009.
Fun in the snow!


Snow in 1984.
© Girraween National Park, 2009.
Snow in 1984.




© Vanessa and Chris Ryan, 2009 | Copyright Details and Disclaimer
Last updated: 29th October 2013